Whatever the Supreme Court decides on Obamacare, it won’t solve our healthcare woes

Karen Higgins, co-president of the National Nurses Union, has an op-ed on the Affordable Healthcare Act over at AlterNet:

Whether the Court throws out or upholds Obamacare, they will still not have universal coverage, medical bills will still push too many Americans into bankruptcy or prompt them to self-ration care, and insurance companies will still have a choke hold on their health.

Let’s credit the law with some positive elements, such as ending lifetime coverage caps and banning exclusion of patients with pre-existing conditions, and permitting young adults up to age 26 remain on their parents’ health plan.

But the law falls fall short of what is needed to bring our national healthcare nightmare to a close.

Despite its name the Affordable Care Act has done little to actually make healthcare affordable. Out of pocket health costs for families continue to soar. Nurses now routinely see patients who have postponed needed care, even when it might be life saving, because of the high co-pays and deductibles.

To actually guarantee affordable healthcare to all, Higgins proposes extending medicare to everybody (something progressives have been talking about for a long time).

She goes on to cite some grisly statistics about the state of U.S. healthcare:

Delayed dental care illustrates the problem. A February Pew Center report cited a 16 percent jump in the number of Americans heading to emergency rooms for routine dental problems, at a cost of 10 times more than preventive care with fewer treatment options than a dentist’s office.

Premiums have jumped 50 percent on average the past seven years, according to a November, 2011 Commonwealth Fund report. More than six in 10 Americans now live in states where their premiums consume a fifth or more of median earnings.

Medical bills for years have been the leading cause of personal bankruptcy. Increasingly they ruin people’s credit as well. Another Commonwealth Fund report earlier this month found that 30 million Americans were contacted by collection agencies in 2010 because of medical bills.

Fifty million still have no health coverage. The percentage of adults with no health insurance at 17.3 percent in the third quarter of 2011 was the highest on record. Another 29 million are under insured with massive holes in their health plans, up 80 percent since 2003, according to the journal Health Affairs. The U.S. may once have had the best healthcare in the world; today that’s only true for the wealthiest among us in a system increasingly defined on ability to pay.

More than 80 percent of U.S. counties trail life expectancy rates of nations with the best life expectancies, the University of Washington found last June. Some U.S. counties are more than 50 years behind their international counterparts.  The U.S. ranks just 41st in the world in death rates for child bearing women, and it has been getting worse, according to the World Health Organization. The average mortality rate within 42 days of childbirth has doubled in two decades, partly due cuts in federal spending for maternal and child health programs the past seven years.

 

1 comment for “Whatever the Supreme Court decides on Obamacare, it won’t solve our healthcare woes

  1. Marcus Woodward
    April 1, 2012 at 1:16 pm

    If it upholds ACA then the law will have to be amended numerous times to effect the desired results. If the Court strikes ACA then the resulting firestorm will cause more change. Justice Scalia posited in his exchange with counsel at oral arguements that the government DOES have the authority to tax and to declare everyone have a health plan FROM THE GOVERNMENT. So with that striking ACA could well mean SINGLE PAYER would soon follow as the demand for solution trumps fear of “socialism” and “socialized medicine”

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